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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
festivals and parades. news say they don't want their civil rights stripped away. >>> here at 7:00 yesterday you talked with us a little bit about dropping temperatures here at home and boy we could feel them today. >> yeah. some big difference, right? some areas as much as ten greece cooler this afternoon but we saw the sunshine in the afternoon, at least most of us did. the low clouds and the fog already moving back in, in fact, it's a little tough to see along highway one in some cases. down in pacifica you may find this or that to be aware of if you're going to be out and about. 61 san ra fell. widespread mid 60s at this time. look at the satellite radar. we're watching this system here that is going to bring us some rain and it looks like in time for some of our trick or treeth tomorrow night. you can see the northwest corner of california seeing just a few light sprinkles at this time. let's talk about what's here at home. we are dealing with just partly cloudy skies, a little bit of fog at the coast tomorrow morning we're going to wake up with the low clouds and fog once again but now
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
prosecutor, a civil rights attorney, founder of a small business and volunteered as chair of both the neighborhood association and an affordable housing organization. when i was elected four years ago, i promised to bring people together to deliver results to increase cooperation and accountability at city hall. over the past four years i'm proud of what we have=hvj÷ accomplishedpj9n together, focusing on what matters to deliver for our dim0]czdñ 3 neighborhoods, again and again. now, we've been creating jobsm with waterfront projects to open the new exploratorium, cruise ship terminal america's cup, north beach chinatown campus, a chinese hospital. we're been keeping families in our city by rebuilding the northeast recreation center, playgrounds all over the district, we've been supporting small businesses cutting small business fees, red tape and championing business tax reform on the november ballot. when proposition e passes so that we end our tax on jobs rather than on profits, our local merchants, our restaura
in the community in accordance with our civil rights, you know, as what's affirmed under the olmstead decision to support people living in the community. so this legislation that was introduced i think is a very important step towards supporting people here and you can expect to be hearing more about it over the next two months and i would encourage everybody to come to the hearings as the legislation is actually discussed in committee and at the board and to voice your support. another piece of that legislation, too, would mandate the installation of telephone jacks in the units because of course communication sometimes is that life and death link to emergency services. i also wanted to bring to the attention of the council a new committee that will start meeting next week. it's called the accessible parking policy advisory committee. this is sponsored by the municipal transportation authority. the first meeting will be on tuesday, october 23, at 2:00 pm at 1 south van ness. the public is welcome. what the committee plans to do is review existing state and local walls that govern placards
the problem. who oversees the school districts, the office of civil rights are in charge of that. they respond to complaints. but no one is enforcing title ix on a regular basis. so, they do not know who is complying and who is not. back to you. >> if you have a tip for our investigative unit, including any issues when you're trying to vote next tuesday, give us a call. or send us an e-mail to the unit at nbcbayarea.com. >>> coming up, eyewitness to disaster. >> frustrated. >> sandy survivors arrive in the bay area. >>> also, the invention of cinema's most famous villains. and there's word that george lucas will try to do a lot of good after selling "star wars." >>> and sergio romo's parade fashion choice has a lot of people talking. >>> a downright cold night already here across the bay area with 48 in santa rosa. we could near some 30s as we head throughout tomorrow morning. and while we're speaking of the cold now, it's all about the warming trend in the seven-day forecast. >>> he has two world series under his belt and one t-shirt that's getting almost as much attention. giants closer serg
and state civil rights laws. >> mr. sanchez. >> scott sanchez, the giants have won and congratulations to them on game 169 world series. [ applause ] >> i think that is the only applause i have gotten here. i hope i don't make it more difficult to understand for the commission. just going through the fact there was a v. from 1991-92 that authorized the garage at the rear. a one-car garage and it was issued and i don't think a building permit was filed. i think it was a previous owner of the building, but that was never invoked. i just happened to find that out today dooing additional research. so the process that we're in now began in 2005. when a variance application was filed in march to allow the garage at the rear. a building permit was filed in june of that year, section 311 neighborhood notify case was done on the garage and building permit. there was no discretionary review filed on that application. there was a hearing and the zoning administrator granted the variance and that was dated november of 2005, seven years ago. almost to the date. the building permit was subsequentl
're a statewide education civil rights organization, i was in san diego unified school district. so, you could see the budget cuts year and year rippling through our schools and our classrooms. and so, what's really at stake when we think about the future is not just our education system, not just our k-12 system, but the economy of our state and our state's future. what proposition 38 does is it reinvests in our k-12 system, our preschool system, for 12 years. on an average, $10 billion a year, and that would actually restore all the cuts that have been slashing through our education system for the last five years. now, that money is protected. it can't be taken by sacramento, it can't be used for other purposes. it has to go to schools. and then it gives films at the school level the ability to make decisions about how to use that money. so, not folks in sacramento, not administrators in districts but folks at the school level. and that's $10 billion a year that can be used to restore arts, music, p.e., extend the school year, all of the things that have been cut from our schools and school dist
. veronica from the civil rights commission who is here today can answer any technical questions, worked closely with general manager carl kelly. and the advisory committee to develop these changes. and, so, we hope that you will endorse them and again, veronica is here to answer any additional questions you might have. >> i would like some public comment. lisa [speaker not understood]. >> i'm glad you guys can see me. good morning, commissioners. my name is lisa [speaker not understood]. i am the chair for the sfpuc small permit advisory committee. and i'd like to thank you today for this opportunity to be able to speak to you. anyways, we are in favor of endorsing these changes and we hope that you would also see fit to do the same thing. you guys have done a great job in creating opportunities for contractors out there, the larger and the smaller contractors. myself, i'm going to kind of wear two hats here. i'm also a field representative with the carpenters union, carpenters local 152 in manteca in which i cover seven counties. and through this we've had opportunities for our members
in their business department. i was very active in the civil rights movement in new orleans. i moved to san francisco in 1980 with my wife cheryl and our son scott because i bought a seat on the pacific stock exchange in order to trade options for my own account. i did that successfully until 1980 at which time i became an arbitrator for finish ra, the financial industry regulatory authority. i'm still an arbitrator for finra. i also taught as an adjunct professor at usf. i taught real estate in their finance department. when i stopped trading i became more deeply involved in that district. i was elected to the st. stevens school board and was also appointed to the board of directors at the stones town ymca. i coached youth sports at the y and i also fund raised for both organizations. later fund raised for sacred heart where my son went to school and st. ignatius where my daughter went to school. my son is in the police department and my daughter works in the tech industry. my wife and i are very proud of both of them. i served on my homeowners association as delegate to the western twin p
, but a civil right. i will now turn the program over to our program administrator, ken stein. >> thank you very much, wendy. last month we had a program, swords to plowshares. today we will be hearing from marc trotz and dr. rag parekh. i want to thank dr. parekh, our first presenter who serves on the front lines of the most difficult to serve clients in the hardest economic times on a daily basis which, it me, is an incredible -- it's astounding what you and ran parker and your team do is remarkable. i also really want to thank marc trotz for coming today. some of you know he's going to be leaving the city at the end of the month and with his travel schedule this month and the fact he's leaving in a few weeks, the fact he took time to come and be with us today is great. i think it speaks super for transition that margo antonetti, is here today, we're delighted he's going to be here. a couple years ago i had the great, great pleasure of taking a tour of one of the city's supportive programs led by marc and it was an hour and a half tour. we don't have that much time today but i was most
legislature. and i saw the beginnings of the current law. there are civil rights laws. there is nothing wrong with that, except that the idea was you just get them back on the streets and they're all going to get well. you get them out of the state hospitals, they're all going to get well. well, first of all, they can't handle their medication. they can't handle treatment. they have to be put in a ward or they have to be put under laura's law where their medication is supervised. if you're going to give them a chance to live. and the people who aren't treated are the people who self-medicate and they have a major portion of the street drug clients. they're the people who self-medicate on alcohol. and when i was putting together two major programs in berkeley which were teleconferencing [speaker not understood] berkeley and ucsf on mental health and public policy and mental health and law, and you can look at those programs by going to mental health law symposium, all of them together on the web and see what those people said. and the last putting together, willie brown, and i know willie brow
is being followed. >> reporter: the office of civil rights in d.c., told us they respond to complaints. but no one is enforcing title ix regularly. a spokesman said they do conduct proactive investigation. but they haven't done any in the last four years. of the more than 200 e-mails we sent, a few did identify the title ix coordinator. but the majority did not respond or didn't know who it was. >> if you have a tip for jenna or anyone on our investigative unit, give us an e-mail or call. >>> a northern california surfer is recovering from emergency surgery tonight after another shark attack. it's the second in nearly a week along the california coast. the second one happened near eureka. you see the bites taken out of that surfboard. two of his friends, one happened to be an emt. both of them used their body weight to stop the victim's bleeding until the paramedics were able to arrive. >> he was gashed up in four or five serious gashes from the nipple down to his hip. he was bleeding out pretty good. >> the victim is reportedly in fair condition. a week ago, a 39-year-old surfer was k
measures. molly munger, the civil rights attorney who have almost completely financed prop 38, that looks like it's going to fail on election day and her brother charles, they both got their money from their dad who is warren buffett's business partner. charlie munger, who operates in republican politics, has been financing this paycheck deduction measure and financing the anti-jerry brown tax measure, though he apparently didn't think he was. that's another story. and yet tom, the hedge fund manager, financing prop 39, i think that's the only one that looks safe at this point. and up got to wonder, i mean, what is it they want? do they see a civic duty, do they see a political future for them? tom, they wonder what he's going to do. but jerry brown is a guy who has been vexed by the munger family. in this race. right? molly munger's prop 38 could be drawing support away from him and her brother charlie munger is financing the campaign apparently to kill his tax measure. >> belva: did one of them put more money in this week? >> the brother, charles, into this political action committee ca
. >> the office of civil rights in washington, d.c. told us they respond to complaints but no one is enforcing title 9 on a regular basis. of the more than 200 e-mails we sent a few principals did identify the coordinator about tut majority did not respond or i didn't know who it was. as a result of our investigation a national nonprofit group says they are taking action. we'll have those as they emerge here on nbc bay area. >> thank you. making a difference. thank you. if you have a tip fora, give us a call. send us e-mail to the unit at nbcbayarea.com. >> trick or treat from you tonight? >> it's no trick that there's rain on the radar, but a little bit of a treat, we're holding it off for the east and the south bay. pretty good transition. thanks for that. 57 in santa rosa now, it's cold on this evening. 62 in concord, 63 in almost and 63 in san jose. not only that but we're tracking this storm with some of the consistent and heavy rainfall. it's moving very slowly so this is good news for some of you, not others. picked up about .1 inch of rain. some of the heaviest rain on the 101 corridor
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
unman e drones however some civil rights have privacy issueshey're hoping this small aircraft could help with other law-enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to it is attractive. >> to lower the amount of fuel in a helicopter which is $1,500 per hour for a helicopter however, these are only $2,200 per month to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drone... drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that and on the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. o
was an evangelical preacher who idolized america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember just being furious, you know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)

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